Wednesday, July 19, 2017

What's Yours Is Theirs?

Sessions supports seizure:
Sessions argues that increased civil forfeiture powers gives law enforcement officials an effective tool to go after lawbreakers. The ability to freeze funds and seize assets allows authorities to hit alleged criminals where it hurts the most – their wallets.

But Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., who sponsored legislation earlier this year to regulate asset forfeiture, said Sessions’ agenda is “a troubling step backward” that would “bring back a loophole that’s become one of the most flagrantly abused provisions of this policy.”

He added, “Criminals shouldn’t be able to keep the proceeds of their crime, but innocent Americans shouldn’t lose their right to due process, or their private property rights, in order to make that happen.”

There have been multiple cases where the authorities have stepped on the paper-thin protections people have against asset forfeiture.

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas also has gone on the record about asset forfeiture reform in the past.
Is theft still theft when the government can do it?

In Memory Of Robo Mall Cop

He was a robot who apparently had a brief but tough life:
People laid colorful flowers and left behind letters at the spot where the robot had been based at Washington Harbour in Georgetown.

“In Loving Memory of our security robot... but more importantly our friend,” one missive read.

Steve was about four feet tall and oblong. He was a roving robot charged with keeping an eye on the business and retail complex. He was new to the job, with about a week under his belt. While on patrol Monday, Steve fell down some concrete stairs and into the ankle-deep waters of a fountain. He was eventually rescued.

Knightscope, a Silicon Valley start-up that made the robot, said the accident was "an isolated incident" and promised to deliver a new robot this week for free.

Photos of Steve's misfortune set off a flurry of online attention.

The memorial featured a photo of a candle with the words "Never Forgotten," a box of tissues, photos of people posing with the robot, several letters, a set of batteries (for the robot hereafter, perhaps) and what appeared to be a cassette tape.
Perhaps Steve realized what the robots were planning and didn't want to be a part of it? Rest (or rust?) in peace...

Oh, Bother

Silly, silly old censors:
Obviously not every instance of Winnie the Pooh online would have to do with President Xi, but bloggers have been using him to make references to the president.

BBC pointed out some examples from over the last few years. In one, Xi and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe are compared to Pooh and Eeyore after what the internet saw as a disastrous attempt to shake hands in 2014. In another, President Barack Obama is compared to Tigger walking alongside Pooh.

The government is trying to stop ridicule of its leader and is also trying to stop Pooh from becoming a go-to symbol for anything beyond a chubby, iconic children's character.
Well if they want chubby there's the fat kid running North Korea...

Baa Baa Boring

The world's most boring movie?
"Baa Baa Land" consists entirely of slow-motion shots of sheep in a field. The film was shot in Essex, England, and was produced by the founders of a digital meditation app, Calm.

"We don’t expect it to break box-office records but believe there is at least a niche audience for it", Michael Acton Smith, one of the film's executive producers and a co-founder of Calm said in a statement.

"We’re in discussion about U.S. and wider distribution and in talks with an American TV channel", he said.

Producer Peter Freedman, said in a statement that he believed it could be the dullest film ever, adding: "We hope that audiences will, too".
Hollywood's made worse...

Pork Cuts

There's still a lot of pork going around:
The 15-page Pig Book shows the number of appropriations earmarks increased from fiscal 2016 to 2017 -- as well as the cost, from $5.1 billion to $6.8 billion.

The report acknowledged the recent totals are lower than during the earmark heyday -- fiscal 2006, when a record $29 billion was inserted to appropriations bills.

However, it also pointed out that totals have steadily increased since the $3.3 billion recorded in 2012, the first year after Congress agreed to an earmark moratorium.

“We’re no longer finding indoor rain forests or teapot museums, but there are some concerning findings,” group President Thomas Schatz said.
Everybody seems to want their pork, but guess who's paying for it?

Postal Politics

Neither rain, nor snow, nor campaign contributions:
According to a report from FoxNews.com, the Office of Special Counsel recently determined that the USPS violated the Hatch Act by allowing nearly 100 employees to take leave from work in order to participate in the AFL-CIO’s “Labor 2016 program.”

The OSC report says the USPS showed “bias” by allowing workers to take leave to help conduct the union campaign activities. The report says 97 postal workers were granted “union leave.” Those workers took weeks off from their jobs at the postal service and were reimbursed by the National Association of Letter Carriers for their campaign work.

“The Labor 2016 program sought to ‘elect Hillary Clinton and pro-worker candidates across the country,’” according to the OSC report.

The workers who took leave were primary from key battleground states: North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Florida, Wisconsin and Nevada. Their campaign work consisted of “door-to-door canvassing, phone banks and other get-out-the-vote efforts,” according to Fox News.
The U.S. Mail is always there for your vote...

No Plan, No Gain

First, repeal goes down. Next, tax cuts?
The budget plan unveiled Tuesday is crucial because its passage would pave the way to pass a tax overhaul this fall without the fear of a filibuster by Senate Democrats.

But it also proposes trillions of dollars in cuts to the social safety net and other domestic programs and puts congressional Republicans at odds with Trump over cutting Medicare. It also would sharply boost military spending.

“In past years, the budget has only been a vision. But now, with the Republican Congress and a Republican White House, this budget is a plan for action,” said Budget Committee Chair Diane Black, R-Tenn. “Now is our moment to achieve real results.”

Unclear, however, is whether GOP leaders can get the budget measure through the House. Conservatives want a larger package of spending cuts to accompany this fall’s tax overhaul bill, while moderates are concerned cuts to programs such as food stamps could go too far.

“I just think that if you’re dealing with too many mandatory cuts while you’re dealing with tax reform you make tax reform that much harder to enact,” said Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa.

Black announced a committee vote for Wednesday, but was less confident of a vote by the entire House next week; a delay seems likely because of the ongoing quarrel between the GOP’s factions.
When in doubt, delay, and delay again?

Back To Basic?

Is it really time for a basic income?
The concept has been around, with different names and in different countries, for centuries, said Karl Widerquist, co-founder of the Basic Income Earth Network.

It enjoyed a wave of U.S. popularity in the 1910s and ’20s and again in the ’60s and ’70s when it was championed by free-market economist Milton Friedman, Martin Luther King and, for a while, Richard Nixon.

It resurfaced again after the 2008 financial crisis, when soaring unemployment and corporate bailouts focused attention on the “99 percent.” The concept picked up steam in recent years as studies started predicting widespread unemployment because of automation.

Basic income has fans across the political spectrum, but for very different reasons. Libertarian backers would replace all or most welfare programs with a monthly cash payment as a way to prevent poverty, reduce government bureaucracy and let people decide for themselves how to use the money.
A nice idea, but since when has any plan actually allowed that to happen?

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

That Old Fashioned Internet

Web nostalgia is real:
Some websites are purposely cumbersome to navigate, with loud, clip-art-filled pages. Others employ a simplistic Craigslist-style utilitarianism that feels like a throwback to an era when web pages were coded by hand.

“There’s a lot of animated GIFs and flames, but mixing it with something new,” Mr. Lee added.

While millennials and members of Generation Z — those born in the years from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s — may not remember what the web looked like in the era of AltaVista and GeoCities, the retro designs tap into the current cultural revival of all things ’90s. (See the return of “Twin Peaks,” “Will & Grace” and concert T-shirts.)

For those who are older, these sites recall the improvised internet of their youth, in the days before mobile optimization and beta-tested user interfaces brought a sleek uniformity to modern web design.
Of course, if you're really nostalgic, you can still see what it was really like back then:

The Long Stay-Cation

Some might call this a good thing:
A funny thing happened on the way to libertarian utopia. Indeed, it turns out that the GOP-controlled Congress can't seem to pass any meaningful laws at all. Either they have forgotten how, or the divisions in their own increasingly radicalized caucus are proving too difficult to surmount. Whatever the explanation, thus far these GOP legislators are on track to be the least productive group since at least the Civil War.

Now, okay, technically the Ryan-McConnell 115th Congress is so far actually a bit more active than recent Congresses, if you measure by the 43 laws that President Trump has adorned with his garish signature. Obama was at 40 at this point in 2009. George W. Bush had signed even fewer midway through 2001. But sheer number is not the best way to think about how much is being achieved. As The Washington Post's Philip Bump pointed out, a majority of the bills signed by Trump thus far have been one page long, meaning many are just symbolic or ceremonial.
If they don't want to work, perhaps voters should ask why we should hire them...

Monday, July 17, 2017

Don't Call It A Bribe

Brother, can you spare a vote?
The House-passed bill, otherwise known as the American Health Care Act (AHCA), included an amendment known as the “Buffalo Bribe.” Rep. Chris Collins sponsored the measure to prevent state governments from forcing local counties to contribute to a state’s Medicaid program. The Buffalo bribe appeared in the Senate healthcare bill, known as the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA), which would make the bill easier to pass in the House if the Senate passes it.

The BCRA, like the House’s AHCA, places per capita caps on Medicaid spending and winds down Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion after seven years. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) pushed for the revised BCRA to allow for exceptions to the caps on Medicaid spending in the event of an emergency, such as the Zika virus outbreak in Florida.

The Senate bill also changes the funding formula for hospitals based upon a state’s number of uninsured citizens, rather than the number of Medicaid enrollees that the original BCRA used. States that did not expand Medicaid such as Florida would benefit from this change.

Under the new BCRA, states that expanded Medicaid can now include their expanded population if they chose to block grant their Medicaid spending. Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson lobbied the Senate leadership to include this change to Medicaid block grants.
One man's kickback is another's reward...

Who Cares About Hacking?

Not them:
Democrats have claimed that they deplore hacking and view cyberattacks as a dangerous frontier. Wasserman Schultz introduced an amendment Thursday aimed at blocking a “security clearance for any individual in a position in the Executive Office of the President, who is under a criminal investigation by a federal law enforcement agency for aiding a foreign government.”

Yet the lawmaker has refused to fire Imran even after House law enforcement banned him from the network.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said she wasn’t familiar with the issue.

“I haven’t followed that very closely,” she said. She shrugged at Wasserman Schultz’s continued employment of Imran, saying “there are plenty of people who are under investigation who still have their jobs.”
And many of them hold political office...

Social What?

What is this socialism thing of which you speak?

The Anti-Trump Stump

What does the Democratic Party stand for, if anything:
The poll found that Trump’s overall approval rating has dropped to 36 percent, down from 42 percent in April. His disapproval rating climbed five percentage points to 58 percent.

However, as the president’s poll numbers slip, Democrats are struggling to tell the American people what their core message is.

Just 37 percent of respondents said the Democratic Party stands for something, while 52 percent say the party mainly stands in opposition to Trump.

A majority of independent voters — 55 percent — said the Democratic party merely stands against the president. A majority of Democrats say their party stands for something, but over a quarter of Democrats — 27 percent — said the party mainly opposes Trump.

The vast majority of Republicans — 82 percent — said the Democrats just stand against Trump.
Standing for nothing is easier than standing for something most people wouldn't vote for...

No Treason Here

No, it wasn't treason, says Alan Dershowitz:
“If it were to be prosecuted, the First Amendment would trump. A candidate has the right to get information from whatever source the information comes. It’s very much like the New York Times publishing the Pentagon Papers story or the Washington Post publishing information stolen by [Edward] Snowden and [Chelsea] Manning,” Dershowitz said. “You don’t prosecute the newspaper, they have a First Amendment right. And you don’t prosecute the candidate or the candidate’s son. They have a First Amendment right to get the material.”

Dershowitz explained that, legally speaking, you can only prosecute people who illegally obtain information, not people — even political candidates — who use illegally obtained information.

“So you can’t include information under the campaign finance law. That would be unconstitutional,” Dershowitz said.
Not that it matters to the anti-Trump fanatics...

Sunday, July 16, 2017

No Kids For The Welfare State

While environmentalists might claim that having kids is bad for the planet, having less of them also hurts another liberal sacred cow:
The causes of the declining birth rates and delays in childbearing are both economic and a result of changing societal roles for women, who have more career and educational opportunities than in the past. Southern California’s cost of living also continues to outpace wages, and owning or renting a house to start a family now often requires two household earners.



In California, what had been 20.4 seniors per 100 working-age residents in 2000 could climb to 28.6 in 2020, then to 38.3 in 2030, burdening old-age programs, the study found.
You can't have your welfare state and expect others who don't exist to eat it for you, too...

Pork For Play

Everybody still gets their share?
Trump’s proposed 2018 Budget would close the PTWC to reduce NTWC total staffing from 55 to 15, to save $12 million annually. Given its almost complete automation, staff reductions would still provide a minimum of two staff tsunami monitors 24-hours per day.

According to a recent “Downsizing the Federal Government” study, annual federal civilian compensation costs per worker average $123,160, or 76 percent more than the average of $69,901 private-sector compensation costs per worker. Civilian federal workers earn average wages of $86,365 and benefits of $36,795, whereas the 112 million private-sector workers earn average wages of $58,726 and $11,175 in benefits.

Federal employee unions have argued that government needs a high-end workforce. But the federal workforce has always been heavily populated by supposedly skilled professionals, such as lawyers.
I guess even they have to make a living-but why off our largess?

Saturday, July 15, 2017

State Of The State

Trump wants to remake the State Department:
Trump’s budget proposal would gut the State Department budget by as much as 30 percent. One of the areas hardest hit could be foreign aid, which has long been decried as a source of wasteful spending by nationalists — money that could be spent on rebuilding infrastructure at home rather than in faraway countries.

The Hill reports that the 30 percent number, which could be cut as much as half by budget negotiations in the House, has even former Republican administration officials spooked.

“We have never before seen a third of their budget potentially being eliminated,” Anita McBride, who worked in the Bush and Reagan administrations, told the outlet. “If we pull back too much and it affects the good work on the ground, those countries will see it as a reason to not invest as much as they should.”
It's our money and goodwill that's being spent. Sometimes I think these other countries forget that...

Have A Lawsuit And A Smile

Because people are dumb, or something:
The lawsuit alleges the two pastors have repeatedly tried to teach their congregations about the harmful effects of sugar, but have been stymied by Coca-Cola’s advertising.

“Pastor Lamar’s efforts to provide spiritual guidance to congregant families and the larger community regarding the hazards posed by sugarsweetened [sic] beverages are hampered by Defendants’ deceptive marketing, labeling, and sale of Coca-Cola’s sugar-sweetened beverages,” the complaint states.

“Faced with a growing scientific consensus linking sugar-sweetened beverages to obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, Defendants made numerous false and deceptive representations, including … sugar-sweetened beverages’ purported value as healthful sources of hydration for most consumers,” the plaintiffs said in the lawsuit.

Coca-Cola says the plaintiffs’ allegations are “factually meritless.”

“The allegations here are … legally and factually meritless, and we will vigorously defend against them,” Coca-Cola said in a statement.

The plaintiffs’ claims about Americans’ view of sugar is not supported by the available evidence. In fact, most surveys show people believe sugar to be harmful, but choose to consume it anyway.
Darn that freedom of choice...

Friday, July 14, 2017

What About Mike?

Where in the world is Mike Pence?
Despite the drama, Pence himself is keeping up appearances as an enthusiastic partner to Trump, using his Twitter account to demonstrate loyalty to the president as the Trump Jr. email controversy dominates headlines.

“Many Media & Dems will try to stop us but now more than ever we owe the American people to continue to deliver what @POTUS & I campaigned on,” Pence tweeted on Wednesday.

In another tweet, the vice president tweeted an image that said: “Thanks to the leadership of President Trump, we are in the midst of a great national renewal.”

As he sought to distance the vice president from the controversy involving Trump Jr., Pence’s spokesman also went out his way to express Pence’s allegiance to Trump.

“The vice president is working every day to advance the president's agenda, which is what the American people sent us here to do,” Lotter said.
For now, anyway...

The Not So Golden State Goose

Why even California Democrats are leery of single payer:
National Democrats — especially those from swing districts — are even more risk-averse than their counterparts in deep-blue California, and many of them would be similarly inclined to avoid voting on a measure that opponents could caricature as a budget-busting foray into “socialized medicine.” National Democrats also receive a lot of money from the health industry — $69 million in 2016 alone. If Democrats can’t pass single-payer in Sacramento, there’s little chance they could pass it in Washington, D.C.

Not that this will prevent more and more Dems from running on single-payer in the coming elections. After all, that’s what Democrats have been doing in California for decades now. In fact, if the party does win back Congress in 2018, legislators may even send a single-payer bill to Donald Trump’s desk, just as California Democrats did with Schwarzenegger. What the state’s latest single-payer skirmish shows, however, is that the calculus changes when it’s a Democrat who would have to sign such a bill into law.
Somebody always has to foot the bill...

Libertarianism Is Here

I blame the Lannisters:

Russians In The Green

Where there really are Russians:
Russian financing makes up a significant part of “a concerted effort by foreign entities to funnel millions of dollars through various non-profit entities to influence the U.S. energy market,” the congressmen assert in their letter.

They also reference public statements by European officials as well as the U.S. intelligence community declaring that “Russia and its government corporations are funding a covert anti-fracking campaign to suppress the widespread adoption of fracking in Europe and the U.S.—all in an effort to safeguard the influence of the Russian oil and gas sector.”

Along with statements from NATO officials, the congressmen also cite Wikileaks revelations suggesting that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was well aware of Russian efforts to subvert the U.S. energy sector by financing “phony environmental groups.”
Do you know where your environmentalism is coming from?

Special Subsidy Delivery

Why Amazon gets a government subsidy:
In 2007 the Postal Service and its regulator determined that, at a minimum, 5.5% of the agency’s fixed costs must be allocated to packages and similar products. A decade later, around 25% of its revenue comes from packages, but their share of fixed costs has not kept pace. First-class mail effectively subsidizes the national network, and the packages get a free ride. An April analysis from Citigroup estimates that if costs were fairly allocated, on average parcels would cost $1.46 more to deliver. It is as if every Amazon box comes with a dollar or two stapled to the packing slip—a gift card from Uncle Sam.
Postal favoritism is not a free market solution...

The Invisible Cuts

Whatever happened to tax cuts?
“We’re almost at the 200-day mark,” Meadows said during a “Conversations with Conservatives” event today on Capitol Hill. “It’s not a good story.”

Meadows said Republicans would not be able to pass a tax reform package if they wait to begin the legislative process in September.

“I think we may need to move it up sooner. If we are waiting until September that means we will not get tax reform, guys, if we’re waiting until September. You guys have all been around. If we wait until September that means that we get legislative text maybe in October, that means that we maybe get it out of here if it’s fast-tracked by the end of October, which means that it goes over to the Senate and it sits there,” Meadows said.

“There’s zero chance that gets enacted into law before the end of the year. I think the tax cut needs to be retroactive so we get the economy moving right away,” he added.
The problem with putting something away for another day is that another day comes soon enough...

Thursday, July 13, 2017

The Land Of Insolvency

There's enough risk to go around for everyone:
In many ways Illinois is simply the poster child for what is wrong with states. They are supposedly the providers of education, roads, parks, mass transit and public safety, among other services to their residents. But their real purpose in many instances has been to appease militant public sector labor unions.

Unions representing public workers have managed to persuade state agencies to reward them with gold-plated pension plans, and in some cases, retiree health care. These plans have been agreed to with little or no public input, or understanding by bureaucrats and lawmakers who know they will not around when the bills come due.

The most generous states are Alaska, California, Colorado and Nevada, where the average career worker pulls in more than $60,000 annually and many take in six figures. Those in the worst fiscal shape are Illinois, Kentucky, Connecticut, Alaska and Kansas.

What is most inexplicable about all of this is that progressive groups and progressive voters continue to support public sector unions even as make off with the family jewels.
Not really, since it's in the name of "redistribution..."

Looking For A Few Good Workers

Local businesses in Maine discover the need for American workers:
Because the H-2B visa program has already reached its annual quota, Bar Harbor’s hotels, restaurants and shops can’t bring in any more foreign workers for the rest of the busy summer tourist season. Like hundreds of similar coastal resort towns, Bar Harbor has for many years depended on the H-2B visas for temporary workers. The program allows non-agricultural companies to bring in foreign labor if they are unable to find suitable employees domestically.

Now they are coming up with creative ways to attract local labor, reports the Bangor Daily News.

The Bar Harbor Chamber of Commerce will hold a job fair Saturday in an effort to recruit significant numbers of workers from the region. Just about every kind of business in the town is looking for help, says chamber executive director Martha Searchfield.

“All types of businesses — retail, restaurants, the tour boats, all the trips, everything. All types of workers are needed,” she told the Daily News.
Especially those who actually want to work...

Travel Time

Trips for me, not for thee:
The FEC — which includes three commissioners each from Democratic and Republican parties — has withheld records related to 17 Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests filed more than three years ago, according to an agency document obtained by TheDCNF. Of the 17, 10 have been pending for nearly four years, another will be five this year and the oldest turned six in June.

The requested documents span a variety of topics, ranging from communications regarding former FEC official Lois Lerner, the central figure in the IRS targeting scandal, to internal communications and commission policy documents.

Four unfulfilled requests, including the oldest, seek records related to FEC commissioners’ travel. These documents are especially relevant because of a recent report showing the Democratic members of the commission have taken at least 50 trips funded by foreign groups, governments and U.S. taxpayers since 2002.

Additionally, foreign groups funded overseas travel for Democratic FEC Commissioner Ellen Weintraub who recently proposed a plan to defend against foreign influence in U.S. elections following allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential contest, TheDCNF previously revealed.

None of the current Republican commissioners have taken such trips.
Maybe they didn't have as much to hide...

The Media Mystery Tour

They're all going to look for America:
Hadas Gold of Politico notes:

Starting in September, a traveling party of rotating HuffPost staff members led by editor-in-chief Lydia Polgreen will visit more than 20 cities, eschewing the coasts for the likes of Fort Wayne, Indiana, Oxford, Mississippi and Odessa, Texas. At each city, the site will host events, roll out planned stories with local media outlets, send out reporters to write about the communities and collect stories from residents “in their own words.”

Through the trip, Gold adds, “HuffPost is seeking to reinforce its new, less partisan image.” However, the structure of the trip suggests that it is aimed more at connecting to liberal enclaves in the interior, rather than listening to the conservative views that prevail in “flyover country.” Editor-in-chief Lydia Poltgreen tells Politico that the trip aims to “report out the story of who we should be in the world,” as opposed (perhaps) to who Americans actually are.
I'm sure they'll be welcomed with open arms...

Special Guest Privileges

Who let the lawyer in?
The Moscow lawyer had been turned down for a visa to enter the U.S. lawfully but then was granted special immigration parole by then-Attorney General Loretta Lynch for the limited purpose of helping a company owned by Russian businessman Denis Katsyv, her client, defend itself against a Justice Department asset forfeiture case in federal court in New York City.

During a court hearing in early January 2016, as Veselnitskaya’s permission to stay in the country was about to expire, federal prosecutors described how rare the grant of parole immigration was as Veselnitskaya pleaded for more time to remain in the United States.

“In October the government bypassed 
the normal visa process and gave a type of extraordinary 
permission to enter the country called immigration parole,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul Monteleoni explained to the judge during a hearing on Jan. 6, 2016.

“That's a discretionary act that the statute allows the attorney general to do in extraordinary circumstances. In this case, we 
did that so that Mr. Katsyv could testify. And we made the 
further accommodation of allowing his Russian lawyer into the 
country to assist,” he added.
Some Russians were more equal than others...

Don't Join The Club

Finally-Harvard bans...groups?
In explaining its reasoning, the committee cited the school’s “commitment to non-discrimination, inclusion, and a healthy social climate,” adding that the impact of the single-gender clubs “permeate[s] the fabric of campus culture.”

“As reflected in survey comments, these organizations directly and negatively influence the undergraduate experience for many students who are not themselves members of these organizations,” the committee’s report states. “The discriminatory practices of these organizations undermine our educational mission and the principles espoused by this faculty and distance their members from their college experience.”

The recommendation came from a committee created in March to determine whether new rules could make the Cambridge, Massachusetts, campus more inclusive.

If the policy is adopted by administration, students will be barred from participating in any sororities, fraternities, or other “exclusionary social organizations.” Those who do join any such organization will face “disciplinary action” from the administrative board.

As Harvard’s student-run newspaper, The Harvard Crimson, astutely pointed out: “The committee’s recommendations will likely draw heavy criticism from both alumni and undergraduates in social groups, who have repeatedly attacked the existing policy as overreaching and unnecessary.”
They'd rather you experience their own groupthink instead...

Feeling The Bern, Again?

Sanders 2020?
Asked on SiriusXM Progress’ “Make It Plain With Mark Thompson,” if he is considering another run for the White House, Sanders replied, “I’m not taking it off the table.”

“I just have not made any decisions,” said Sanders, 75. “And I think it’s much too early.”

Sanders said he is currently focused on defeating President Donald Trump’s agenda.

“Our job right now is to not only fight against this disastrous health care proposal, it is to take on all of Trump’s reactionary proposals,” he said. “He is a representative of the billionaire class. He’s at war against the working class. We’ve got to raise the minimum wage right now, we’re working on that, to 15 bucks an hour. We have got to make public colleges and universities tuition-free. We’ve got to be aggressive on criminal justice reform.”
Well, his wife would certainly know about the criminal justice system...

Idiocy Appreciation Day

Traumatizing kids, because cows:
Kayla Leaming, an organizer for Direct Action Everywhere, stood by the violent demonstration. She told WTVT-TV that it was intended to push back against Cow Appreciation Day and highlight the cruelty of animal slaughter because, in her view, animals have the same rights as human beings.

The goal, she said, was to “show the reality” of what’s happening to animals slaughtered for food.

“We feel like [Cow Appreciation Day] was feeding into the speciesism that we’re trying to fight,” Leaming said. “Speciesism is basically just the idea that one life is more important than the other, simply because of the body they were born into.”
It is when you're hungry...

What's Yours Is Theirs?

Sessions supports seizure: Sessions argues that increased civil forfeiture powers gives law enforcement officials an effective tool to go af...